Hymns and Prayers

Trees (pg. 2)

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, DIX.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Burkhardt, Michael. As Though the Whole Creation Cried. Morningstar MSM-10-555 [2001] (√+)
  • Burkhardt, Michael. Easy Hymn Settings General. Set 2 Morningstar MSM-10-715 [1997]
  • Busarow, Donald. All Praise to You, Eternal God. Augsburg 11-9076 [1980]
  • Cassler, G. Winston. Organ Descants for Selected Hymns. Augsburg 11-9304 [1972]
  • Fedak, Alfred V. Hymn Intonations Preludes and Free Harmonizations. Vol III. Selah 160-723 [1992]
  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Pooler, Marie. Festival Hymns with descants. Augsburg  11-9181 [1963]
  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. VI Selah 160-726 [1992]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Shaw, Geoffrey. The Descant Hymn Book bk 2. Novello
  • Thiman, Eric. Varied Accompaniments to Thirty-Four Well-Known Hymn Tunes. Oxford ISBN 0 19 323210 3[1937]
  • Winn, Cyril. 41 Descants to Familiar Hymn Tunes. Oxford [1961]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]
  • Organ, Anne Krentz. Let It Rip! At the Piano. vol. 2 Augsburg ISBN 0-8006-7580-0 [2003]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Michael Morgan from Psalms 1, 26, 52, and 92 © 2011 Michael Morgan, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (DIX 7.7.7.7.7.7): Conrad Kocher, 1838; adapt. William H. Monk, 1861, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words:  permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint it.

O Splendor of God’s Glory Bright (pg. 1030)

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, PUER NOBIS

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Ambrose of Milan, 4th c., tr. composite, P.D.
  • Music (PUER NOBIS 8.8.8.8): Trier manuscript, 15th c., Michael Praetorius, adapt.; harm. George Ratcliffe Woodward, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint this song.

Lord of All Hopefulness (pg. 1036)

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 2 = Ps. 25:5
st. 4 = Ps. 4:8

Joyce Torrens-Graham (b. Westminster, London, England, 1901; d. New York, NY, 1953) wrote many poems and essays under the pen name of Jan Struther (derived from her mother's maiden name, Eva Anstruther). She wrote this text at the request of Percy Dearmer, with whom she prepared the enlarged edition of Songs of Praise (1931). It was first published in that hymnal to the tune SLANE. According to Frank Colquhoun, the text "is a work with a warm human touch, a healthy spiritual tone, and well merits its popularity." It is one of the best examples of the "all-day" hymn texts (dealing with the whole day, from morning to evening).

The four stanzas begin by addressing God in terms of his attributes and then ask for specific blessings for morning, noon, evening, and night. Displaying a consistent literary structure, the text, according to Dearmer, "is indeed a lovely example of the fitting together of thought, words and music."

In addition to her pen name, Struther also had the married names of Mrs. Anthony Maxtone Graham and, from a second marriage, Mrs. Adolf Kurt Placzek. During World War II she moved with her children to New York City and remained there until her death. In England she is best known for her novel Mrs. Miniver (1940), which consists of sketches of British family life before World War II. Immensely popular, the book was later made into a movie. Struther also wrote comic and serious poetry, essays, and short stories, published in Betsinda Dances and Other Poems (1931), Try Anything Twice (1938), The Glass Blower (1941), and, posthumously, The Children's Bells (1957). Songs of Praise (1931) included twelve of her hymn texts.

Liturgical Use:
Occasions of worship that focus on trusting the Lord's guidance; the hymn's "all day" theme also permits a choice of stanzas for specific times.

Tune Information:

SLANE is an old Irish folk tune associated with the ballad 'With My Love Come on the Road" in Patrick W. Joyce's Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909). It became a hymn tune when it was arranged by David Evans and set to the Irish hymn "Be Thou My Vision" published in the Church Hymnary (1927). SLANE is named for a hill in County Meath, Ireland, where St. Patrick's lighting of an Easter fire–an act of defiance against the pagan king Loegaire (fifth century)–led to his unlimited freedom to preach the gospel in Ireland.

SLANE is an attractive tune with phrases that demonstrate a wide range and creative melodic patterns. The harmonization, one of two settings in The Hymnal 1982, is accessible to good singers (especially to low basses!), but most congregations may prefer unison throughout. Support the singing with rather light but energetic accompaniment.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, SLANE.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Busarow, Donald. Thirty More Accompaniments for Hymns in Canon. Augsburg11-10163 [1992]
  • Copes, V. Earle. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol II Selah 160-722 [1991]
  • Eggert, John. Creative Hymn Accompaniments for Organ. vol. 2 CPH 97-6851 [2000]
  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]
  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Carlson, J. Bert. Let It Rip! At the Piano. Augsburg 11-11045 [2000]
  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Jan Struther (1901-1953) from Enlarged Songs of Praise, 1931. Reproduced by permission of Oxford University Press.
  • Music (SLANE 10.11.11.12): Irish; harm. The Hymnal 1982 © Church Pension Group/Church Publishing, Inc.
  • Reprint Information:

Joyous Light of Heavenly Glory (pg. 1040)

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Greek hymn, 3rd c.; para. Marty Haugen (b. 1950) © 1987 GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Music (JOYOUS LIGHT 8.7.8.7 D): Marty Haugen (b. 1950) © 1987 GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Reprint Information:

Prayers of the People (pg. 1043)

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Prayers of the People: taken from Eastern Liturgies of St. Basil and St. Chrysostom, P.D.; concluding prayer adapt. from the Book of Common Worship © 1993 Westminster John Knox Press. Reprinted by permission.
  • Prayer Words and Music: Byzantine chant, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint this prayer.

All Praise to You, My God, This Night (pg. 1046)

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1092 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is taken from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1 = Ps. 91
st. 2 = Prov. 3:24
st. 3 = Ps. 4:8

Anglican bishop Thomas Ken (b. Berkampstead, Hertfordshire, England, 1637; d. Longleat, Wiltshire, England, 1711) wrote a group of three hymns for morning, evening, and midnight devotions for the students at Winchester College; this is the evening hymn. Ken suggested that the students sing these hymns "in your chamber devoutly." Although an unauthorized pamphlet version of the evening hymn appeared in 1692, the text was first published in Henry Playford's Harmonia Sacra (1693). Ken published the text in his Manual of Prayers (1695 ed.) and revised it for his 1709 edition. That edition is the source of the Psalter Hymnal version which presents a modernized text of four of the original twelve stanzas (st. 1, 2, 4, and 12). Some hymnals begin the text with these words: "Glory to Thee, my God, this night," a line from Ken's 1695 publication. Typical of the piety of Ken's day, the original stanza 3 read:

Teach me to live, that I may dread
The grave as little as my bed;
Teach me to die, that so I may
Rise glorious at the awful day.

The oldest and most popular of the traditional English evening hymns, "All Praise to You" has standard features of an evening hymn: thanksgiving for the day that is past (st. 1), penitence for sin committed (st. 2), prayer for peaceful sleep (st. 3), and confidence in God's care and keeping (st. 1-3). The final stanza (st. 4) has become the most famous doxology in the English language (also found at 637 and 638).

Thomas Ken studied at Winchester College, Hart Hall, and New College, Oxford, England. Ordained in the Church of England in 1662, he served variously as pastor, chaplain at Winchester College (1669-1679), chaplain to Princess (later Queen) Mary in The Hague, and bishop of Bath and Wells (1685-1691). He was a man of conscience and independent mind who did not shirk from confrontations with royalty. When King Charles II came to visit Winchester, he took along his mistress, the famous actress Nell Gwynne. Ken was asked to provide lodging for her. The story is told that Ken quickly declared his house under repair and had a builder take off the roof! He later was dismissed from the court at The Hague when he protested a case of immorality. Then, later in 1688, Bishop Ken refused to read King James II's Declaration of Indulgence in the churches, which granted greater religious freedom in England, and he was briefly imprisoned in the Tower of London. A few years later he refused to swear allegiance to King William, and he lost his bishopric.

Ken wrote many hymns, which were published posthumously in 1721 and republished in 1868 as Bishop Ken s Christian Year, or Hymns and Poems for the Holy Days and Festivals of the Church. But he is best known for his morning, evening, and midnight hymns, each of which have as their final stanza the famous doxology “Praise God, from Whom All Blessings Flow.”

Liturgical Use:
A fine evening hymn well suited to the close of evening worship; midweek prayer meetings; Old Year’s Eve services (“night” would then be used in the figurative sense).

Tune Information:

TALLIS CANON is one of nine tunes Thomas Tallis contributed to Matthew Parker's Psalter (around 1561). There it was used as a setting for Psalm 67. In the original tune the melody began in the tenor, followed by the soprano, and featured repeated phrases. Thomas Ravenscroft published the tune, with the repeat¬ phrases omitted, in his Whole Book of Psalmes (1621). The Ravenscroft version is the setting that virtually all modern hymnals use for this text.

TALLIS CANON is a round most congregations can easily sing in two parts, especially when women sing the first part and men sing the second. The congregation could also sing the hymn as a four-part round (each entry at four beats). Try also to sing unaccompanied (organists could sound the first phrase of each entry and then sing along).

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, TALLIS’ CANON

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Busarow, Donald. All Praise to You, Eternal God. Augsburg 11-9076 1980 [p35]
  • Cassler, G. Winston. Organ Descants for Selected Hymns. Augsburg 11-9304 [1972]
  • Fedak, Alfred V. Hymn Intonations Preludes and Free Harmonizations. Vol III. Selah 160-723 [1992]
  • Hobby, Robert A. Three Evening Hymns. Set 2 Morningstar MSM-10-514 [1998]
  • Johnson, David N. Free Harmonizations of Twelve Hymn Tunes. Augsburg 11-9190 [1964]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Shaw, Geoffrey. The Descant Hymn-Tune Book bk 1. Novello 15207
  • Thiman, Eric. Varied Accompaniments to Thirty-Four Well-Known Hymn Tunes. Oxford ISBN 0 19 323210 3 [1937]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Maynard, Lynette. Let It Rip! At the Piano. vol. 2 Augsburg ISBN 0-8006-7580-0 [2003]
     

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Thomas Ken, 1709, alt., P.D.
  • Music (TALLIS CANON 8.8.8.8): Thomas Tallis, ca. 1561, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint this prayer.