Psalm 107

107A: Give Thanks to God Who Hears Our Cries

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1087 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Tune Information:

MORNING SONG is a folk tune that has some resemblance to the traditional English tune for "Old King Cole." The tune appeared anonymously in Part II of John Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music (1813). In 1816 it was credited to "Mr. Dean," which some scholars believe was a misprinted reference to Elkanah K. Dare, a composer who contributed more than a dozen tunes to Wyeth's Repository. In the original harmonization the melody was in the tenor. The tune is also known as CONSOLATION (and KENTUCKY HARMONY), its title in Ananias Davisson's Kentucky Harmony (1816), where it was set to Isaac Watts' morning song, "Once More, My Soul, the Rising Day."

Jack Grotenhuis composed the harmonization in Tempe, Arizona, in late November 1983 (a few weeks before his death). The Episcopal Hymnal 1982 provides two additional settings.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, MORNING SONG

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Busarow, Donald. All Praise to You, Eternal God. Augsburg 11-9076 [1980]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Ruth C. Duck © 2011 GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Music (MORNING SONG/CONSOLATION 8.6.8.6.8.6): J. Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; harm. Jack Grotenhuis, 1983, © 1987 Faith Alive Christian Resources
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107B: Song: I Cry Out

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1087 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • For more information about this song (Good to Me), refer to the Leader’s Edition of Sing! A New Creation.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Craig Musseau (b. 1965) © 1990 Vineyard Songs (Canada)/ION Publishing, admin. in North America by Music Services o/b/o Vineyard Music USA
  • Reprint Information:

107C: A Responsorial Setting

Performance Notes:

  • For notes on this setting, see page 1087 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Isaac Everett © Isaac Everett, admin. Church Pension Group/Church Publishing, Inc.
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: permitted with a CCLI License.
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

107D: Thanks Be to God Our Savior

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1087 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Text Information:

Praise for God's unfailing deliverance of those who cry to him in the crises of their lives – even when they suffer the just consequences of their sins–and a call to ponder the ways of God.

Scripture References:
st. 1 = vv. 1-3
st. 2 = vv. 4-9
st. 3 = vv. 10-16
st. 4 = vv. 17-22
st. 5 = vv. 23-32
st. 6 = vv. 33-43

Psalm 107 opens Book V of the Psalms in their final arrangement, but its affinities with 105 and 106 suggest that the three once formed a trilogy. Psalm 107 was likely composed by a priest or Levite for liturgical use at the temple. Its date is uncertain, but this interpretation seems probable: having experienced God's mercies anew in the return from Babylonian exile (vv. 2-3), Israel is called to thank the LORD (st. 1) and to meditate on God's compassion toward those who cried out to him during a crisis.

The psalm focuses on four such crises (vv. 4-32). In the first, people are lost in a desert without food or water (vv. 4-9; st. 2), and in the last, they are caught in a perilous storm at sea (vv. 23-32; st. 5). In the second and third, they suffer for their rebellious ways–as captives forced to bitter labor (vv. 10-16; st. 3) and as victims of serious illness (vv. 17-22; st. 4). A supplement (vv. 33-42) recalls how God often sends famine followed by times of plenty, and oppression followed by deliverance–to the joy of the upright and the dismay of the wicked. All these things, says the psalmist, should move the wise and godly to ponder God's mercies (st. 6).

David Diephouse versified Psalm 107 in 1985 for the Psalter Hymnal.

Liturgical Use:
Thanksgiving for God's aid in times of friendlessness, homelessness, imprisonment, illness, or other crisis in the Christian community.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: David J. Diephouse, 1985, © 1987 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (DJ DEEP HOUSE 7.6.7.6.6.7.7.7): Greg Scheer © 2011 Greg Scheer
  • Reprint Information: