Psalm 111

111A: O Give the LORD Wholehearted Praise

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

William Gardiner (b. Leicester, England, 1770; d. Leicester, 1853) first published GERMANY as a setting for the text "As a Shepherd Gently Leads Us" in his Sacred Melodies (vol. 2, 1815), in which he attributed it to Ludwig van Beethoven. The last phrase of this tune resembles a part of the first theme of the Allegretto movement of Beethoven's Piano Trio, Op. 7, No.2. The first phrase is from the opening of the aria “Possenti Numi” in Mozart's The Magic Flute. The tune is also known by the names BEETHOVEN, FULDA, WALTON, or GARDINER. Sing GERMANY briskly to get the sense of two long lines rather than four shorter, choppy ones. Antiphony is helpful for singing the entire psalm.

The son of an English hosiery manufacturer, Gardiner took up his father's trade in addition to writing about music, composing, and editing. Having met Joseph Haydn and Ludwig van Beethoven on his business travels, Gardiner then proceeded to help popularize their compositions, especially Beethoven's, in England. He recorded his memories of various musicians in Music and Friends (3 volumes, 1838-1853). In the first two volumes of Sacred Melodies (1812, 1815), Gardiner turned melodies from composers such as Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven into hymn tunes in an attempt to rejuvenate the singing of psalms. His work became an important model for American editors like Lowell Mason, and later hymnbook editors often turned to Gardiner as a source of tunes derived from classical music.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, GERMANY/WALTON/FULDA.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Cassler, G. Winston. Organ Descants for Selected Hymns. Augsburg 11-9304 [1972]
  • Goode, Jack C. Thirty-Four Changes on Hymn Tunes. H W Grey GB 644 [1978]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalter, 1912, alt., P.D.
  • Music (GERMANY 8.8.8.8): W. Gardiner’s Sacred Melodies, 1815, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.

111B: Alleluia! Laud and Blessing

Performance Notes:

 

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1088 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, ALL SAINTS.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalms 111 and 112; para. Michael Morgan © 2011 Michael Morgan, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (ALL SAINTS/WEISSE FLAGGEN 8.7.8.7 D): as in Tochter Sion, Cologne, 1741, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint it.

111C: A Responsorial Setting

Performance Notes:

  • The following article is about "The Fear of the Lord". It is written by Emily Brink and taken from Reformed Worship.

Here is one more psalm to consider. Psalm 111 is the first of a whole set of psalms of praise (Psalms 111-118) that begin with the word Hallelujah and recount the great works of our covenant God. (Note that Hallelujah is often translated “Praise the Lord” in current translations, including the new NIV and the NRSV; the small caps on Lord indicates the way Christians and Jews have often addressed God rather than speaking the name “Yahweh.”)

Psalm 111 ends with wisdom instruction in the often-memorized final verse: “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.” That wisdom verse must have been a commonly recited proverb in Israel as well, since it is found also in Job 28:28, Proverbs 1:7, and Proverbs 9:10.

Psalm 111 is set here with a refrain by Jay Wilkey, a retired Presbyterian church musician.  Consider asking your children to lead the congregation in this refrain, and then have a cantor read—or chant!—the entire psalm.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Jay Wilkey © 2003 Jay Wilkey
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: please contact Jay Wilkey
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

111D: Rejoice in God, My Heart

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

Named after the Jewish cantor whose performance of the Yigdal inspired Olivers to write this text, LEONI is the second of the seven historic Jewish melodies associated with the great Hebrew doxology, which were handed down orally from one cantor to another. Olivers adapted Lyon's version for congregational use. Known also by his liturgical name, Meyer Leoni (b. London, England, 1751; d. Kingston, Jamaica, 1797), Lyon was a tenor at the Covent Garden and Drury Lane theaters in London and a cantor in several synagogues, including the Great Synagogue in Aldgate.

LEONI is a magnificent tune with lots of life and vibrant rhythms. Sing the outer stanzas in a full-voiced unison and the middle ones in harmony at a more moderate volume. The harmonization is taken from Hymns Ancient and Modern (1875). Because the Yigdal was traditionally sung in responsorial fashion, antiphonal singing might be appropriate.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, LEONI/YIGDAL

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Burkhardt, Michael  As Though the Whole Creation Cried  vol. 2. Morningstar MSM-10-606 [2009]
  • Busarow, Donald. Thirty More Accompaniments for Hymns in Canon. Augsburg11-10163 [1992]
  • Cassler, G. Winston. Organ Descants for Selected Hymns. Augsburg 11-9304 [1972]
  • Eggert, John. Creative Hymn Accompaniments for Organ. vol. 2 CPH97-6851 [2000]
  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Shaw, Geoffrey. The Descant Hymn-Tune Book bk 1. Novello 15207
  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Timothy Dudley-Smith (b. 1926) © Timothy Dudley-Smith in Europe and Africa, reproduced by  permission of Oxford University Press; © 2006 Hope Publishing Company in the United States and the rest of the world
  • Music (LEONI/YIGDAL 6.6.8.4 d): Hebrew melody; adapt. Meyer Lyon (1751-1797), P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint the Music for use in a worship setting.