Psalm 117

117A: Bān-bîn ah/Let All Nations

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1088 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • This song is originally from “Sound the Bamboo”, a hymnal from the Christian Conference of Asia. To see more performance notes on this song, you can purchase the Hymnal Companion to “Sound the Bamboo”. Both the collection and companion are published by GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • Buy a recording of this song from Princeton Theological Seminary's Touring Choir, on their CD "Sing Praise to the Lord!".

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalm 117, tr. Hsiang-chi Chang and I-to Loh (b. 1936), alt. © 1990 Christian Conference of Asia, admin. GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Music (O-LÓ 7.7.7.7): Hsiang-chi Chang and I-to Loh (b. 1936) © 1990, 2000 and arr. I-to Loh (b. 1936) © 2011 Christian Conference of Asia, admin. GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Reprint Information:

117B: Laudate Dominum/Sing, Praise, and Bless the Lord

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1088 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • For more information about this song, refer to the Leader’s Edition of Sing! A New Creation.

Other Resources:

  • Purchase an octavo arrangement or a recording of this song that is published by GIA Publications, Inc. (Please note: This song is found on many CDs that are published by GIA Publications, Inc.)
  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: The Community of Taizé © 1991 Ateliers et Presses de Taizé, Taizé Community, France, GIA Publications, Inc., exclusive North American agent
  • Music: Jacques Berthier (1923-1994) © 1991 Ateliers et Presses de Taizé, Taizé Community, France, GIA Publications, Inc., exclusive North American agent
  • Reprint Information:

117C: From All That Dwell Below the Skies

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

LASST UNS ERFREUEN derives its opening line and several other melodic ideas from GENEVAN 68. The tune was first published with the Easter text "Lasst uns erfreuen herzlich sehr" in the Jesuit hymnal Ausserlesene Catlwlische Geistliche Kirchengesänge (Cologne, 1623). LASST UNS ERFREUEN appeared in later hymnals with variations in the "alleluia" phrases.

The setting is by Ralph Vaughan Williams; first published in The English Hymnal (1906), it has become the most popular version of LASST UNS ERFREUEN. In that hymnal the tune was set to Athelstan Riley's "Ye watchers and ye holy ones" (thus it is sometimes known as VIGILES ET SANCTI).

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, LASST UNS ERFREUEN

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Burkhardt, Michael. As Though the Whole Creation Cried. Morningstar MSM-10-555 [2001]
  • Burkhardt, Michael. 5 Psalm Hymn Improvisations. Morningstar MSM-10-511 [1997]
  • Copes, V. Earle. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol II Selah 160-722 [1991]
  • Eggert, John. Creative Hymn Accompaniments for Organ. vol. 2 CPH97-6851 [2000]
  • Ferguson, John Festival Hymns for Organ Brass and Tympani. set 3 GIA G-4124 [1995]
  • Ferguson, John. Hymn Harmonizations for Organ. bk. 3 Ludwig O-10 [1986]
  • Goode, Jack C. Thirty-four Changes on Hymn Tunes. H W Grey GB 644 [1978]
  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Johnson, David N. Free Harmonizations of Twelve Hymn Tunes. Augsburg 11-9190 [1964]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • McKinney, Howard D. Preludes for Fifty-Five Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 9770 [1967]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. I Selah 160-720 [1991]
  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. VI Selah 160-726 [1992]
  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. VIII Selah 160-728 [1996]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Shaw, Geoffrey. The Descant Hymn-Tune Book bk 1. Novello 15207
  • Sowerby, Leo. Ten Hymn Tune Descants. H.W.Grey CMR 2838 [1965]
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]
  • Winn, Cyril. 41 Descants to Familiar Hymn Tunes. Oxford [1961]
  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]
  • Porter, Rachel Trelstad. Let It Rip! At the Piano. Augsburg 11-11045 [2000]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Isaac Watts (1674-1748), 1719, P.D.
  • Music (LASST UNS ERFREUEN 8.8.8.8 with alleluias): Auserlesen Catholische Geistliche Kirchengesänge, Cologne, 1623; adapt. and harm. Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958), 1906, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.

117D: Alabad al Señor/Praise the Lord!

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1088 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalm 117; tr. Mary Louise Bringle (b. 1953), 2011, © 2011 GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Music: traditional; arr. Marcus Hong © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:

117E: Hallelujah, Hallelujah

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

A call to all nations to praise the LORD.

The seventh of eight "hallelujah" psalms (111-118), 117 is an expanded "Praise the LORD." It was probably composed for use at the beginning or end of temple liturgies. It stands fifth in the "Egyptian Hallel" used in Jewish liturgy at the annual religious festivals prescribed in the Torah. At Passover, Psalms 113 and 114 were sung before the meal; 115 through 118 were sung after the meal. Psalm 117 is only one stanza in length, but in calling all nations to praise the LORD for being faithful to Israel, it powerfully anticipates the Great Commission (Matt. 28:18-20). Paul quotes verse 1 in Romans 15:11 as proof that the salvation of Gentiles was not a divine afterthought. The versification derives from The Book of Psalms (1871), a text-only psalter that was later published with music in the 1887 Psalter.

Liturgica1 Use:
As an expanded "hallelujah," Psalm 117 has many uses in worship–by itself or possibly as a frame for another hymn.

Tune Information:

IN BABILONE is a traditional Dutch melody that appeared in Oude en Nieuwe Hollantse Boerenlities en Contradansen (Old and New Dutch Peasant Songs and Country Dances), c. 1710. Ralph Vaughan Williams discovered this tune as arranged by Julius Rontgen (b. Leipzig, Germany, 1855; d. Utrecht, the Netherlands, 1932) and included it in The English Hymnal (1906), from which it gained widespread use. A rounded barform tune (AABA), IN BABILONE provides a fine setting for Psalm 117's cosmic scope. Because this song has only one stanza, use the tune as an alternate to other texts in 87 87 D so that congregations may sing it more often. Stretch the cadence a bit to catch a breath at the end of line 3 (ending in the word accord).

An important Dutch pianist, composer, conductor, scholar, and editor, Rontgen studied music in Leipzig with well-known German teachers. In 1877 he moved to Amsterdam, where he first taught at the Amsterdam Conservatory. In 1886 he became conductor of the Society for the Advancement of Musical Art. He returned to the Conservatory as director in 1918, and then retired in 1924 to devote himself to composition. He was a friend of leading composers of his day, including Liszt, Brahms, and Grieg, and wrote a biography of Grieg. Rontgen's compositions include symphonies, chamber works, operas, and film scores.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, IN BABILONE.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Powell, Robert J. Free Hymn Accompaniments. Abingdon APM-513 [1979]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]
  • Sedio, Mark. Let It Rip! At the Piano. vol. 2 Augsburg ISBN 0-8006-7580-0 [2003]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalter, 1887, alt., P.D.
  • Music (IN BABILONE 8.7.8.7 d): Oude en Nieuwe Hollantse Boerenlities en Contradansen, 1710, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.

117F: O Praise the Lord Our God

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Konstantin Zhigulin © 2011 Konstantin Zhigulin
  • Reprint Information: