Psalm 130

130A: Out of the Depths I Cry to You

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, AUS TIEFER NOT.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]

Alternative Harmonization for Organ:

  • Krapf, Gerhard. Hymn Preludes for Holy Communion. vol. 3 Concordia 97-5488 [1988]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Martin Luther, 1524; tr. Gracia Grindal © 1978, 2006 Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Music (AUS TIEFER NOT 8.7.8.7.8.8.7): Martin Luther, 1524; harm. Austin C. Lovelace, 1963, © 1964 Abingdon Press, admin. The Copyright Company
  • Reprint Information:

130B: A Responsorial Setting

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalm 130:1
  • Music: Kathleen Harmon, S. N. D. de N. © 1993 Institute for Liturgical Ministry, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

130C: Out of the Depths I Cry to You on High

Performance Notes:

Psalm 130 is very appropriate to the season of Lent, especially for a service of confession, when we acknowledge how great our sins are and how in need we are of the mercy of the Lord. Actually, the text, especially stanza 2, also serves well during Advent, when the emphasis is on watching and waiting for the coming redemption of the Lord.

The text in the Psalter Hymnal, versified by Robert Swets of Grand Rapids, Michigan, follows the biblical text very closely. Swets chose to work without rhyme in order to make the text as concise as possible; the whole psalm is covered in two stanzas.

The tune from the Genevan Psalter has been associated with this text since the early days of the Reformation (1539). The combination of text and tune bears a striking resemblance in mood to Luther's text and tune for Psalm 130: "Aus defer not." Both melodies begin with a falling fifth, and are somber in character. Rejoice in the Lord (#97) includes this Genevan melody set to Psalm 32, "How Blest Are They Whose Trespass"; the rhythm has been altered in a few places.

The harmony is adapted from Claude Goudimel's complete four-part settings (1564) of all the Genevan Psalter tunes. Since in those days the Reformed churches sang only in unison, these settings were intended for home use. Goudimel's original, like most harmonies of the time, placed the melody in the tenor.

The organist may want to introduce the tune of this psalm to the congregation by playing the tenor melody in the left hand on a solo stop. John Hamersma has composed four variations on Psalm 130, available in The Composers' Workshop Series II, Calvin College Department of Music, Grand Rapids, MI 49506.

Once the tune is relatively familiar, the choir should introduce the words. The psalm serves well as a call to confession (both stanzas) or as a combination call to confession (stanza 1) and assurance of forgiveness (stanza 2).

After both words and tune have been introduced, invite the congregation to join the choir, singing the psalm in unison (at least for the first few times). A somber sound for the first stanza should be followed by a brighter and fuller sound on the second.

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st.1 = Ps. 130:1-4
st.2 = Ps. 130:5-6

Psalm 130, from which this hymn derives, is one of the traditional penitential psalms. The versification (altered) is from the 1912 Psalter.

Liturgical Use:
Advent; Lent; service of confession and forgiveness; other occasions of penitence.

Tune Information:

Charles H. Purday (b. Folkestone, Kent, England, 1799; d. Kensington, London, England, 1885) composed SANDON for John Henry Newman's text "Lead, Kindly Light, amid the Encircling Gloom." Other hymnals use the tune for John D. S. Campbell's paraphrase of Psalm 121, "Unto the Hills Around Do I Lift Up," a setting much loved in Canada.

Respected and loved by many, SANDON is a bar-form tune (AABC) with a fine sense of climax in its fourth line. Try antiphonal singing on stanzas 1 and 2, and ask everyone to join in on stanza 3.

A publisher, composer, lecturer, and writer, Purday had a special interest in church music. He published Crown Court Psalmody (1854), Church and Home Metrical Psalter and Hymnal (1860), which included SANDON, and, with Frances Havergal, Songs of Peace and Joy (1879). A precentor in the Scottish Church in Crown Court, London, Purday sang at the coronation of Queen Victoria. In the publishing field he is known as a strong proponent of better copyright laws to protect the works of authors and publishers.

 Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, SANDON

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Rawsthorne, Noel. More Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew [1996]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalter, 1912, alt., P.D.
  • Music (SANDON 10.4.10.4.10.10): Charles H. Purday, 1860, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint this song.

130D: Out of the Depths I Cry to You

Other Resources:

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Karl Digerness, adapted from Out of the Deep I Call, by Henry W. Baker, 1868, © 2005 Karl Digerness
  • Music: Karl Digerness © 2005 Karl Digerness; arr. Eelco Vos © 2011 Karl Digerness
  • Reprint Information:

130E: In Deep Despair I Cry to You

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

MORNING SONG is a folk tune that has some resemblance to the traditional English tune for "Old King Cole." The tune appeared anonymously in Part II of John Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music (1813). In 1816 it was credited to "Mr. Dean," which some scholars believe was a misprinted reference to Elkanah K. Dare, a composer who contributed more than a dozen tunes to Wyeth's Repository. In the original harmonization the melody was in the tenor. The tune is also known as CONSOLATION (and KENTUCKY HARMONY), its title in Ananias Davisson's Kentucky Harmony (1816), where it was set to Isaac Watts' morning song, "Once More, My Soul, the Rising Day."

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, MORNING SONG

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Busarow, Donald. All Praise to You, Eternal God. Augsburg 11-9076 [1980]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Joy F. Patterson (b. 1931), 1991, © 1994 Selah Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Music (MORNING SONG/CONSOLATION  8.6.8.6.8.6): Sixteen Tune Settings, 1812; attr. Elkanah Kelsey Dare; harm. David Ashley White, 1994, © 1994 Selah Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Reprint Information:

130F: From the Depths of Sin and Sadness

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Willard F. Jabusch, ca. 1966, © 1966 Willard F. Jabusch, admin. OCP Publications
  • Music (RUSSIAN 8.7.8.7 with repeat): Russian folk melody; harm. Susan G. Wente © 1977 World Library Publications
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130G: For You, My God, I Wait

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1089 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Adam M. L. Tice © 2011 GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Music (SPRINGTIME 6.6.8.6): David Ward © 2011 David Ward, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:

130H: A Prayer of Hope

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Melissa Haupt, 2011, © Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
  • Reprint Information:
    • You do not need permission to reprint this prayer; please use the correct copyright line.