Psalm 135

135A: Exalt the LORD, His Praise Proclaim

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1 = Ps. 135:1-4
st. 2 = Ps. 135:5-7
st. 3 = Ps. 135:1-2, 19-21

This versification of parts of Psalm 135 comes from the The Book of Psalms (1871), a text-only psalter that was later published with music in 1887. Minor alterations were made in various later psalters, including that of 1912. These stanzas are basically the call-to-praise sections that frame Psalm 135.

Tune Information:

The tune CREATION is taken from the chorus “The Heavens Are Telling” from the well known oratorio The Creation (1798) by Franz Joseph Haydn (b. Rohrau, Austria, 1732; d. Vienna, Austria, 1809). Haydn's life was relatively uneventful, but his artistic legacy was truly astounding. He began his musical career as a choirboy in St. Stephen's Cathedral, Vienna, spent some years in that city making a precarious living as a music teacher and composer, and then served as music director for the Esterhazy family from 1761 to 1790. Haydn became a most productive and widely respected composer of symphonies, chamber music, and piano sonatas. In his retirement years he took two extended tours to England, which resulted in his "London" symphonies and (because of G. F. Handel's influence) in oratorios. Haydn's church music includes six great Masses and a few original hymn tunes. Hymnal editors have also arranged hymn tunes from various themes in Haydn's music.

William Gardiner altered CREATION to long-meter double in 1812; it was published in its present form in 1848 in Mason and Webb's The National Psalmist. CREATION is essentially a bar form (AABB') with a harmony well-suited to part singing; take it on a half-note pulse.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalter, 1887; rev. Psalter, 1912, alt., P.D.
  • Music (CREATION 8.8.8.8 D): Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), 1798, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint this song.

135B: O Praise God’s Name Together

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

Composed by Samuel S. Wesley, AURELIA (meaning "golden") was published as a setting for “Jerusalem the Golden” in Selection of Psalms and Hymns, which was compiled by Charles Kemble and Wesley in 1864. Though opinions vary concerning the tune's merits (Henry J. Gauntlett once condemned it as "secular twaddle"), it has been firmly associated with Stone's text since tune and text first appeared together in the 1868 edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern. However, Erik Routley suggests rejuvenating this text by singing it to ST. THEODULPH.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, AURELIA.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Burkhardt, Michael. Easy Hymn Settings General set 1.  Morningstar MSM-10-815 [1996]
  • Cassler, G. Winston. Organ Descants for Selected Hymns. Augsburg 11-9304 [1972]
  • Ferguson, John. Hymn Harmonizations. bk. 5 Ludwig O-14 [1992]
  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • McKinney, Howard D. Preludes for Fifty-Five Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 9770 [1967]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Powell, Robert J. Free Hymn Accompaniments. Abingdon APM-513 [1979]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Sowerby, Leo. Ten Hymn Tune Descants. H.W.Grey CMR 2838 [1965]
  • Thiman, Eric. Varied Accompaniments to Thirty-Four Well-Known Hymn Tunes. Oxford ISBN 0 19 323210 3 [1937]
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]
  • Winn, Cyril. 41 Descants to Familiar Hymn Tunes. Oxford [1961]
  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Cherwien, David. Let It Rip! At the Piano. Augsburg 11-11045 [2000] (√+)
  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008] (√; E-M; too “fluffy” for text)

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Michael Morgan © 2011 Michael Morgan, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (AURELIA 7.6.7.6 D): Samuel S. Wesley, 1864, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint it.