Psalm 147

147A: A Responsorial Setting

Performance Notes:

  • For notes on this setting, see page 1091 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • Purchase an octavo arrangement or recording of the Honduran Alleluia that is published by GIA Publications, Inc.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Honduran traditional
  • Music: Honduran traditional; arr. John L. Bell (b. 1949) © 1995 Wild Goose Resource Group, Iona Community, Scotland, GIA Publications, Inc., exclusive North American agent
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information for the Refrain:
    • Words and Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net.
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

 

  • Music (MOZART ALLELUIA): W. A. Mozart (1756-1791), from Exultate, Jubilate, adapt., P.D.
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information for the Alternative Refrain:
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint it.
    • Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting; please use the correct copyright line.

147B: Praise the Lord Who Heals

Other Resources:

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Norman Agatep © 2010 Jesuit Communication Foundation, Inc.
  • Music: Norman Agatep © 2010 Jesuit Communication Foundation, Inc.; arr. Joel Navarro © 2011 Joel Navarro, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:

147C: Sing to God, with Joy and Gladness

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1091 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • Purchase a collection or recording written by John Bell that contains this song and is published by GIA Publications, Inc.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: John L. Bell (b. 1949) © 1993 Wild Goose Resource Group, Iona Community, Scotland, GIA Publications, Inc., exclusive North American agent
  • Music (GLENDON 8.7.8.7 with refrain): John L. Bell (b. 1949) © 1993 Wild Goose Resource Group, Iona Community, Scotland, GIA Publications, Inc., exclusive North American agent
  • Reprint Information:

147D: O Praise the LORD, for It Is Good

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1 = Ps. 147:1-3
st. 2 = Ps. 147:4-9
st. 3 = Ps. 147: 10-13

The people of Jerusalem (v. 2) become the "church" (st. 1) in this hymn-like versification of Psalm 147. With minor alterations in each stanza, the versification comes from the 1912 Psalter.

Tune Information:

John H. Stockton (b. New Hope, PA, 1813; d. Philadelphia, PA, 1877) composed MINERVA for one of his own gospel-hymn texts, "Come, Every Soul by Sin Oppressed." The tune was published in his Salvation Melodies No.1 (1874); however, it had also been published earlier in Joyful Songs Nos. 1-3 Combined (1869) with the note "arr. by W. G. Fischer, by permission."

The significance of the tune title MINERVA is unknown, unless for some reason it refers to the mythical Roman goddess of wisdom. It is also sometimes known as STOCKTON, after its composer.

Although born into a Presbyterian home, Stockton was converted at the age of twenty-one in a Methodist revival meeting. He became a lay preacher in the Methodist Church in 1844 and was ordained in 1857. After serving several pastorates in New Jersey, he retired in 1874 due to ill health. Throughout his ministry he was strongly interested in evangelism and music. When Dwight 1. Moody and Ira D. Sankey held their revival meetings in Philadelphia, Stockton assisted them and wrote several gospel songs and tunes for their use. He published two collections of hymns: Salvation Melodies (1874) and Precious Songs (1875).

MINERVA is a simple tune in ABB'B form with one consistent rhythmic pattern and the simple harmonization common to many gospel hymns–and thus is easy for guitar. Sing this tune in harmony at a lively tempo using crisp rhythms over a legato organ pedal. The descant was composed by Dale Grotenhuis in 1976 as part of a collection of descants for the 1959 edition of the Psalter Hymnal.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalter, 1912, alt., P.D.
  • Music (MINERVA 8.6.8.6 D): John H. Stockton, 1874, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.

147E: Sing Praise to Our Creator

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Praise of God, the benevolent LORD of creation, who faithfully sustains and provides for his people.

Scripture References:
st. 1 = vv. 1-3
st. 2 = vv. 4-7
st. 3 = vv. 8-11
st. 4 = vv. 12-18
st. 5 = vv. 19-20, 1

This post-exilic hymn may have been composed for the Levitical choir when Nehemiah dedicated the rebuilt walls of Jerusalem (v. 2; see Neh. 12:27-43). The psalmist sings the greatness and goodness of God-the Creator, Provider, and benevolent Ruler of creation, the Redeemer and faithful Keeper of his chosen people. For each aspect of God's work the psalmist cites a number of specific illustrations. As Creator (st. 1), God numbers the stars (st. 2) and governs the orderly cycle of the seasons (st. 4). As Provider, God sends rain on the earth so that all creatures have food (st. 3). As benevolent Ruler, the LORD heals the brokenhearted and raises up the lowly but casts down the arrogant and the wicked (st. 2-3). As Israel's Redeemer and Keeper, God gathers the exiles; rebuilds Jerusalem (v. 2; st. 1) and strengthens its defenses (v. 13); gives peace along its borders and abundant crops in the fields (v. 14; st. 4); and reveals to the people the LORD's laws and decrees (st. 5). Marie J. Post versified this psalm in 1985 for the Psalter Hymnal. Another setting of Psalm 147 is at 187.

Liturgical Use:
Especially appropriate for services focusing on God's providence; many other uses in Christian worship.

Tune Information:

John Bacchus Dykes (b. Kingston-upon-Hull' England, 1823; d. Ticehurst, Sussex, England, 1876) wrote HARTFORD in 1872 for the text “The Voice that Breathed o'er Eden” on the occasion of a friend's wedding. The American tune title HARTFORD refers to the capital of Connecticut. The tune is known in England as BLAIRGOWRIE, which refers to a small island town northwest of Dundee, Scotland. The tune became the setting for Psalm 147 in the 1912 Psalter. Surely intended for part singing, HARTFORD is a double-meter tune with dependable rhythms and ascending melodic motives. Singers should combine the eight short phrases into four long lines; accompanists will want to use lots of bright organ color–and other instruments for festive services.

As a young child Dykes took violin and piano lessons. At the age of ten he became the organist of St. John's in Hull, where his grandfather was vicar. After receiving a classics degree from St. Catherine College, Cambridge, England, he was ordained in the Church of England in 1847. In 1849 he became the precentor and choir director at Durham Cathedral, where he introduced reforms in the choir by insisting on consistent attendance, increasing rehearsals, and initiating music festivals. He served the parish of St. Oswald in Durham from 1862 until the year of his death. To the chagrin of his bishop, Dykes favored the high church practices associated with the Oxford Movement (choir robes, incense, and the like). A number of his three hundred hymn tunes are still respected as durable examples of Victorian hymnody. Most of his tunes were first published in Chope's Congregational Hymn and Tune Book (1857) and in early editions of the famous British hymnal, Hymns Ancient and Modern.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Marie J. Post, 1985, © 1987 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (HARTFORD 7.6.7.6 D): John B. Dykes (1823-1876), P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint the Music.

147F: A Prayer of Praise

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • John D. Witvliet, 2011, © Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
  • Reprint Information:
    • You do not need permission to reprint this prayer; please use the correct copyright line.