Psalm 148

148A: Let All Creation’s Wonders

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Martin Leckebusch © 2001 Kevin Mayhew Ltd.
  • Music (THAXTED 7.6.7.6 triple): Gustav Holst, 1921, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint it.

148B: O Bless the Lord

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: John Michaels (b. 1947) © 1984 OCP Publications
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148C: Praise the LORD, Sing Hallelujah

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1 = Ps. 148: 1-4
st. 2 = Ps. 148:5-8
st. 3 = Ps. 148:9-12
ref. = Ps. 148:13-14

This versification of Psalm 148 is found in various later nineteenth-century Presbyterian psalters in the United States. All editions of the Psalter Hymnal have included this text to the tune PRAISE JEHOVAH as combined in the 1927 United Presbyterian Bible Songs Hymnal.

Tune Information:

PRAISE JEHOVAH was composed by William J. Kirkpatrick (b. Duncannon, PA, 1838; d. Philadelphia, PA, 1921) and joined in the 1890s to this versification of Psalm 148, with the original seventh stanza becoming the refrain. The tune was published with an 1899 copyright date in Life Songs, a 1916 publication of the Mennonite Publishing House.

Kirkpatrick received his musical training from his father and several other private teachers. A carpenter by trade, he engaged in the furniture business from 1862 to 1878. He left that profession to dedicate his life to music, serving as music director at Grace Methodist Church in Philadelphia. Kirkpatrick compiled some one hundred gospel song collections; his first, Devotional Melodies (1859), was published when he was only twenty-one years old. Many of these collections were first published by the John Hood Company and later by Kirkpatrick's own Praise Publishing Company, both in Philadelphia.

PRAISE JEHOVAH (also known as KIRKPATRICK and AINOS) is a splendid example of the best of gospel hymn writing: a strong melody, a variety of rhythms, and some independence in the harmony parts (especially in the refrain). Well-suited to part singing, PRAISE JEHOVAH can be sung in the common stanza-refrain pattern, but the order of the text would suggest singing the refrain (which can also be considered st. 4) only after stanzas 1 through 3. Try antiphonal singing on the three stanzas; have everyone sing the refrain. Sing the dotted rhythms crisply to distinguish them clearly from the regular eighth notes.

Other Resources:

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Bible Songs Hymnal, 1927, alt., P.D.
  • Music (PRAISE JEHOVAH 8.7.8.7 with refrain): William J. Kirkpatrick (1838-1921), P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.

148D: All the Saints Join In

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1091 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Tommy Walker © 1988, 2005 Universal Music Brentwood-Benson, admin. Music Services; arr. Eelco Vos © 2011 Universal Music Brentwood-Benson, admin. Music Services
  • Reprint Information:

148E: Hallelujah! Sing Praise to Your Creator

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1091 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Indonesian, Tilly Lubis © 2009 Yamuger, Indonesian Institute for Sacred Music; English vers. David J. Diephouse © 2009 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (NYANYIKANLAH): traditional Batak melody, Toba, Indonesia; arr. H. A. Pandopo © 1999 H. A. Pandopo
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148F: Praise the LORD! O Heavens, Adore Him

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1091 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Text Information:

A summons to a universal choir to praise the LORD, the Creator of heaven and earth, who has redeemed his people.

Scripture References:
st. 1 = vv. 1-6
st. 2 = vv. 7-10
st. 3 = vv. 11-14

A post-exilic hymn, Psalm 148 maintains that God's glory displayed in creation and redemption is so great that the praise on Israel's lips (as in 149) needs to be supplemented by a chorus from all creation. Let everything created in the heavens praise God for the majesty and ordered goodness of the celestial realm (st. 1). Let all created things on earth and in the seas praise their Maker (st. 2). Let all people join in praising God for salvation "from sin and shame" (st. 3). The versification of stanzas 1 and 3b is from an anonymous leaflet appended to a collection of psalms, hymns, and anthems for the Foundling Hospital in London (1796). Stanzas 2 and 3a (altered) are from the 1912 Psalter. Other settings of Psalm 148 are at 188 and 466.

Liturgical Use:
This cosmic call to praise is fitting at the beginning of worship and for many other occasions; especially appropriate for Thanksgiving and for similar services focusing on how the creation around us praises the Lord.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, AUSTRIA/AUSTRIAN HYMN .

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Copes, V. Earle. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol II Selah 160-722 [1991]
  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • McKinney, Howard D. Preludes for Fifty-Five Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 9770 [1967]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Powell, Robert J. Free Hymn Accompaniments. Abingdon APM-513 [1979]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Shaw, Geoffrey. The Descant Hymn-Tune Book bk 1. Novello 15207
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]
  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: st. 1 Foundling Hospital Collection, 1796, alt.; sts. 2-3 Psalter, 1912, alt., P.D.
  • Music (AUSTRIAN HYMN 8.7.8.7 D): Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), 1797, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.

148G: A Responsorial Setting

Performance Notes:

  • For notes on this setting, see page 1091 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Text Information:

Scripture References
st. = Luke 2: 14

The third "great" canticle in Luke's gospel (2:14) records the song the angels sang at the birth of Jesus. However, it is sometimes not counted as a canticle because it was expanded in later liturgical use into the Gloria, a longer text that began with this verse and became a regular part of the daily Mass. The Latin incipit of this text, "Gloria in excelsis Deo," is often used independently as a chorus of praise, as in the refrain of 347 and other Christmas carols.

A certain F. A. Schultz prepared the text and music for "Ere zij God"; it was published in Bickers's and in the numerous editions of the popular Zangbundel compiled by Johannes De Heer in the first half of the twentieth century. Those collections provided a means for those who sang only psalms in church to sing many popular hymns at home. "Ere zij God" is the best-known Dutch carol in the Netherlands, and many Christian Reformed congregations with and without Dutch immigrants have made this song part of their Christmas celebration.

Jan Luth, current director of the Liturgical Institute at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, suggests that the composer may have been Franz Albert Schultz (b. Neustettin, Germany, 1692; d. 1763), a German Lutheran theologian educated in Balle. In 1732 he became a professor of theology at Konigsberg in East Prussia, where he spearheaded reforms in the Prussian church and educational system according to an ideal of "active Christianity" Further research is needed to determine whether or not this carol was perhaps translated from German into Dutch.

The composite English versification prepared for the 1987 Psalter Hymnal follows the New International Version, which restricts God's favor to his chosen people. "Glory to God" is a fine hymn of praise to God, who brings peace to his people on earth through the birth of the Messiah.

Liturgical Use:
Christmas Day services and other occasions celebrating the significance of Christ's birth.

Tune Information:

ERE ZIJ GOD is a tune "stretched" into rounded binary form and concluded with a double "amen" coda. Although it's ideally sung unaccompanied and in harmony, festive instruments, such as a brass quartet, can add a celebrative accent.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Luke 2:14; para F. A. Schultz, ca. 1870; tr. Psalter Hymnal, 1987, © 1987 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (ERE ZIJ GOD fragment): F. A. Schultz, ca. 1870, P.D.
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint it.
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

 

  • Words: traditional
  • Music: Abraham Maraire; arr. Patrick Matsikenyiri © Zimbabwe East Annual Conference, admin. General Board of Global Ministries t/a GBGMusik
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net
    • Tone: Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the tone for use in a worship setting; please use the correct copyright line.

148H: Hallelujah! Praise the LORD from the Heavens

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1091 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: from Psalter for the Christian People © Liturgical Press
  • Music: George Thalben-Ball © Evelyn P. Thalben-Ball, admin. Calder & Co.
  • Reprint Information:

148I: Let the Whole Creation Cry

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

The tune SALZBURG, named after the Austrian city made famous by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, was first published anonymously in the nineteenth edition of Praxis Pietatis Melica (1678); in that hymnbook's twenty-fourth edition (1690) the tune was attributed to Jakob Hintze (b. Bernau, Germany, 1622; d. Berlin, Germany, 1702). Partly as a result of the Thirty Years' War and partly to further his musical education, Hintze traveled widely as a youth, including trips to Sweden and Lithuania. In 1659 he settled in Berlin, where he served as court musician to the Elector of Brandenburg from 1666 to 1695. Hintze is known mainly for his editing of the later editions of Johann Crüger's Praxis Pietatis Melica, to which he contributed some sixty-five of his original tunes.

The harmonization by Johann S. Bach is simplified from his setting in his Choralgesänge (Rejoice in the Lord [231] and The Hymna1 1982 [135] both contain Bach's full harmonization). The tune is a rounded bar form (AABA) easily sung in harmony. But sing the refrain line in unison with full organ registration.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, ALLE MENSCHEN MÜSSEN STERBEN/SALZBURG.

Alternative Harmonizations for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Cassler, G. Winston. Organ Descants for Selected Hymns. Augsburg 11-9304 [1972]
  • Ferguson, John. Hymn Harmonizations. bk. 5 Ludwig O-14 [1992]
  • Johnson, David N. Free Organ Accompaniments to Hymns. vol. 3 Augsburg 11-9189 [1966]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Fifty Free Organ Accompaniments to Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8430 [1949]
  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. VIII Selah 160-728 [1996]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Stopford A. Brooke, 1881, P.D.
  • Music (SALZBURG 7.7.7.7 D): Jakob Hintze, 1678; harm. Johann S. Bach (1685-1750); from Hymns Ancient and Modern, 1861, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint this song.