Psalm 15

15A: LORD, Who Are They That May Dwell

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

A call to self-examination on the part of all who wish access to the presence of God.

Scripture References:
st. 1 = v. 1
st. 2 = vv. 2-3
st. 3 = vv. 3-4a
st. 4 = vv. 4b-5
st. 5 = vv. 1, 5

Though the details of temple worship are largely unknown, Psalm 15 may have served as part of an entrance liturgy. The song reminds all who would worship at the temple that entrance into God's presence requires self-examination (st. 1) and cannot be purchased with sacrifices; only those whose lives conform to God's moral law will be received by God (st. 2-4) and will be blessed with God's unfailing care (st. 5).

The unrhymed versification by James E. Seddon (b. Ormskirk, Lancashire, England, 1915; d. London, England, 1983) was first published in Psalm Praise (1973); in the Psalter Hymnal the singular "he" has been altered to "they." Psalm Praise, first published in England and subsequently in the United States, broke new ground in psalm singing by providing contemporary settings of the psalms and other portions of Scripture.

Seddon received his musical training at the London College of Music and Trinity College in London and his theological training at the Bible Churchmen's Theological College (now Trinity College) in Bristol. He served various Anglican parishes in England from 1939 to 1945 as well as from 1967 to 1980. Seddon was a missionary in Morocco from 1945 to 1955 and the home secretary for the Bible Churchmen's Missionary Society from 1955 to 1967. Many of his thirty hymns are based on missionary themes; he wrote some in Arabic while he lived in Morocco. Seddon joined other Jubilate Group participants to produce Psalm Praise (1973) and Hymns for Today's Church (1982).

Liturgical Use:
Beginning of worship; during service of confession and forgiveness; exposition on the lifestyle acceptable to God.

Tune Information:

Norman L. Warren (b. London, England, 1934) composed STELLA CARMEL in 1971 for Seddon's text; it was also first published in Psalm Praise. The tune consists of four phrases connected by cadential harmonies that help keep alive the song's rhythmic energy. To make clear the question-and-response structure of the text, a soloist or choir could sing stanza 1, and everyone could respond by singing stanzas 2 through 5.

Warren was educated at Dulwich College, Corpus Christi College, and Ridley Hall Theological College in Cambridge, and was ordained in the Church of England in 1961. He served as vicar of St. Paul's Church, Leamington Spa (1963-1977), rector of Morden (1977-1989), and since 1989 has been archdeacon of Rochester. His publications include Journey into Life (1964) and What's the Point? (1986). Warren was a member of the Jubilate Group committees that published Psalm Praise (1973) and Hymns for Today's Church (1982). He has composed over one hundred hymn tunes.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: James E. Seddon, 1971, alt. © 1973 The Jubilate Group, admin. Hope Publishing Company
  • Music (STELLA CARMEL 7.7.7.7): Norman L. Warren, 1971, © 1973 The Jubilate Group, admin. Hope Publishing Company
  • Reprint Information:

15B: Lord, Who Shall Be Welcome

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1078 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Steven C. Warner © 2006 World Library Publications
  • Reprint Information:

15C: A Responsorial Setting: I’m Gonna Live So God Can Use Me

Performance Notes:

  •  For performance notes on this song, see page 1078 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • Buy a recording of this song from Princeton Theological Seminary's Touring Choir, on their CD "Sing Praise to the Lord!".

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Afro-American spiritual, P.D.
  • Music (I'M GONNA LIVE): traditional; arr. Wendell Whalum (1932-1987) © the Estate of Wendell Whalum
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone (both the Tone and the Alternative Tone): © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: The Words are in public domain, you do not need copyright permission to reprint the Words.
    • Music: please contact the copyright holder, the Estate of Wendell Whalum, for permission. 
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please include the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

15D: LORD, Who May Dwell Within Your House

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1078 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Tune Information:

CRlMOND was first published in The Northern Psalter (1872), where the tune was attributed to David Grant (b. Aberdeen, Scotland, 1833; d. Lewisham, London, England, 1893), who arranged many of the tunes in that collection. However, in 1911 Anna B. Irvine claimed that CRIMOND had been composed by her sister, Jessie Seymour Irvine (b. Dunnottar, Kincardineshire, Scotland, 1836; d. Aberdeen, Scotland, 1887), who had given it to Grant to be harmonized. Irvine's authorship is generally accepted today. Little is known of Irvine's life except that she was the daughter of an Anglican minister and lived in her parents' home for much of her life.

CRIMOND became very popular after it was used at the wedding of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in 1947. Named after the town of Crimond in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, the tune is considered by many to be among the finest of all Scottish psalm tunes.

David Grant composed the harmonization. A tobacco shop merchant by trade, Grant was an amateur musician. He composed music for bands, arranged tunes for The Northern Psalter (1872), and served as precentor of the Footdee Church in Aberdeen.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, CRIMOND.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]

Alternative harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008] (√; E-M; with organ)

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Christopher L. Webber © 1986 Christopher L. Webber
  • Music (CRIMOND 8.6.8.6): Jessie Seymour Irvine, 1872; harm. David Grant, 1872, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: please contact the copyright holder, Christopher L. Webber.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this Music.

15E: A Prayer of Confession

Performance Notes:

  • For notes on this prayer, see page 1078 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information: