Psalm 33

33A: A Responsorial Setting: Lord, Let Your Lovingkindness

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1080 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalm 33:22
  • Music (based on the tune A LA VENUE DE NOËL): Betty Carr Pulkingham © 1991 Celebration
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information for the Refrain:
    • Words and Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in worship settings.

 

  • Alternative Refrain Words: James V. Marchionda © 1969, 1981, 1997 International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation
  • Alternative Refrain Music: James V. Marchionda, acc. Laura Kutscher © 1994 World Library Publications
  • Alternative Tone: © 1997 Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Reprint Information for the Alternative Refrain:

33B: Rejoice, You Righteous, in the Lord

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

Published in a chapel hymnal for the Duke of Würtemberg (Gesangbuch der Herzogl, 1784), ELLACOMBE (the name of a village in Devonshire, England) was first set to the words "Ave Maria, klarer und lichter Morgenstern." During the first half of the nineteenth century various German hymnals altered the tune. Since ELLACOMBE's inclusion in the 1868 Appendix to Hymns Ancient and Modern, where it was set to John Daniell's children's hymn "Come, Sing with Holy Gladness," its use throughout the English-speaking world has spread.

ELLACOMBE is a rounded bar form (AABA), rather cheerful in character, and easily sung in harmony.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, ELLACOMBE.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Archer, Malcolm. After the Last Verse. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 502 6 [1995]
  • Burkhardt, Michael. Easy Hymn Settings Lent.  Morningstar MSM-10-315 [1992]
  • Copes, V. Earle. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol II Selah 160-722 [1991]
  • Ferguson, John. Hymn Harmonizations for Organ. bk. 1 Ludwig O-05 [1975]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • Pooler, Marie. Festival Hymns with descants. Augsburg  11-9181 [1963]
  • Powell, Robert J. Free Hymn Accompaniments. Abingdon APM-513 [1979]
  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. I Selah 160-720 [1991]
  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. VI Selah 160-726 [1992]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]
  • Winn, Cyril. 41 Descants to Familiar Hymn Tunes. Oxford [1961]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Michael Morgan © 1999, 2011 Michael Morgan, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (ELLACOMBE 8.6.8.6 D): Gesangbuch der Herzogl Wirtembergischen Kotholischen Hofkapelle, Wittenburg, 1784, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint it.

33C: The LORD God from His Throne on High

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

GENEVAN 68 is usually attributed to Matthäus Greiter (b. Aichach, Bavaria, 1490; d. Strasbourg, France, 1550). It was published as a setting for Psalm 119 in Das dritt theil Strassburger Kirchenampt (1525), which Greiter and his friend Wolfgang Dachstein edited. Greiter studied at Freiburg University and became a monk and musician at the Strassburg Cathedral. Influenced by Wolfgang Dachstein, Greiter joined the Lutheran Church in 1524 and served several Lutheran congregations in the Strassburg area. He also taught at the Gymnasium Argentinense (high school) and eventually directed a choir school. However, the year before his death Greiter returned to the Roman Catholic Church. He is thought to have been the music editor of John Calvin's first Strasbourg Psalter, Aulcuns Pseaulmes et Cantiques (1539).

Greiter's tune was later published with Psalm 36 in the 1539 Strasbourg Psalter approved by John Calvin for worship in Geneva, and still later with Psalm 68 in the 1562 edition of the Genevan Psalter. This sturdy tune is known among Lutherans as O MENSCH BEWEIN' and in the British tradition (with alterations) as OLD 113TH. Written in the Ionian (major) mode, GENEVAN 68 became the battle song of the Calvinist Reformation throughout Europe (analogous to Luther's "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" in the Lutheran tradition). It has been called the "Huguenot Marseillaise," and stanzas 1 and 6 (1 and 10 in the old Dutch versification) are probably the best known in the Dutch Reformed tradition.

The melody consists of four long phrases shaped into a bar form (AABC). Its first phrase is identical to the first phrase of LASST UNS ERFREUEN.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: st. 1 Psalter Hymnal, 1934; st. 2 Marie J. Post, alt., P.D.
  • Music (GENEVAN 68 | 8.8.6.8.8.6 D): Genevan Psalter, 1539, P.D.; harm. Howard Slenk © 1987 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: The Words are in Public Domain; you do not need permission to reprint them.
    • Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.