Psalm 66

66A: Cry Out to God in Joy

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1083 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Steven C. Warner © 2006 World Library Publications
  • Reprint Information:

66B: Come, All You People

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1083 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • For more information about this song, refer to the Leader’s Edition of Sing! A New Creation.
  • To read more performance notes and descants for this song, see the book Halle, Halle: We Sing the World Round as written by C. Michael Hawn and published by Choristers Guild.

Other Resources:

  • Purchase an octavo arrangement or a recording of this song that is published by GIA Publications, Inc.
  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, UYAI MOSE

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Beckstrand, William. Let It Rip! At the Piano. vol. 2 Augsburg ISBN 0-8006-7580-0 [2003]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: st. 1 Alexander Gondo (20th c., Zimbabwe); tr. I-to Loh (b. 1936) © 1986 World Council of Churches; sts. 2-3 from With One Voice, 1995, © Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Music (UYAIMOSE 5.6.5.6.5.6.7): Alexander Gondo © 1986 World Council of Churches; arr. John L. Bell (b. 1949) © 1993 Wild Goose Resource Group, Iona Community, Scotland, GIA Publications, Inc., exclusive North American agent
  • Reprint Information:

66C: Come, All You People, Praise Our God

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st.1 = Ps. 66:8-12
st.2 = Ps. 66:13-15
st.3 = Ps. 66:16-20

Though this versification is based on Psalm 66:8-20, it doesn’t incorporate the strong literary images of the biblical text (66). Still, “Come, All You People” does pick up significant themes common to praise psalms: praise God for deliverance (st.1), fulfillment of vows and dedication to God’s service (st.2), and public testimony to God’s salvation and care (st.3). Stanzas 1 and 2 use the plural case, calling all people to communal and consecrated worship of God, and stanza 3 uses the singular, relating the psalmist’s personal experience with God for the benefit of “all who fear the Lord.”

The versification (altered) is from the 1912 Psalter and originally began with the words “Come, all ye people, bless our God.”

Liturgical Use:
Beginning of worship; offering of gifts, times of turmoil; thanksgiving for deliverance.

Tune Information:

ADOWA was composed by Charles H. Gabriel, the noted gospel songwriter, during the Billy Sunday-Homer Rodeheaver evangelistic crusades of the 1910s, and was published with this text in the 1912 Psalter. Sing the tune in two very long phrases.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Psalter, 1912, P.D.
  • Music (ADOWA 8.8.6 D): Charles H. Gabriel (1856-1932), P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need a permission to reprint this song.

66D: A Responsorial Setting

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Steven C. Warner © 2006 World Library Publications
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: please contact World Library Publications
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

66E: Praise Our God with Shouts of Joy

Performance Notes:

Tune Information:

GENEVAN 136 was first published in the 1562 edition of the Genevan Psalter. The 1564 harmonization by Claude Goudimel originally placed the melody in the tenor. One of the shortest and brightest tunes from Geneva, this music may be sung responsorially (with a soloist for the narrative stanzas and everyone on the refrain parts, that is, the second half of each even-numbered stanza) or antiphonally (with two groups alternating on the narration, and everyone singing the refrain parts). The tune is in Mixolydian mode and properly ends on D. However, to modern ears D may need resolution to G, the opening chord. For that reason and because of the short tune and narrative style, do not hold the last chord. Instead, continue the rhythmic motion between verses without a pause, especially when singing antiphonally or responsorially.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Christopher Idle, 1978, © 1990 The Jubilate Group, admin. Hope Publishing Company
  • Music (GENEVAN 136|7.7.7.7): Genevan Psalter, 1562; harm. Claude Goudimel (ca. 1505-1572), 1564, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint the music.