Psalm 87

87A: Zion, Founded on the Mountain

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1 = Ps. 87:1-2
st. 2 = Ps. 87:3-5
st. 3 = Ps. 87:6-7

This setting of Psalm 87 is more a poetic summary than the versification in the psalter section (87). It derives from the 1912 Psalter; with stanzas 2 and 3 significantly revised for the Psalter Hymnal.

Tune Information:

WORCESTER was composed in England by Walter G. Whinfield (b. South Elkington, Lincolnshire, England, 1865; d. Dodford, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England, 1919); it was published in the United States in the Episcopal Church Hymnal (1892). The tune is distinguished by its "rocket" motif–the rapid ascent of the first two lines–and by its stately cadence. Whinfield received both a BA and a B.Mus. from Magdalen College in Oxford. Ordained a priest in the Church of England in 1891, he served several parishes and published a collection of his hymn tunes in 1902. WORCESTER is named after the English county Hereford-Worcester, in which Whinfield served as a pastor in the parishes of Bromsgrove and Dodford for some twenty years.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: st. 1 Psalter, 1912; sts. 2-3 Psalter Hymnal, 1987, © 1987 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (WORCHESTER 8.7.8.7.4.7): Walter G. Whinfield (1865-1919); harm. Paul Bunjes (1914-1998) © 1982 Concordia Publishing House
  • Reprint Information:

87B: Built upon God’s Holy Mountain

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Emma Turl © 2009 The Jubilate Group, admin. Hope Publishing Company
  • Music (MORGENLIED 8.7.8.7 D with refrain): Frederick Charles Maker (1844-1927), P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • Music: The Music is in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint it.

87C: A Prayer for the Nations

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

87D: Glorious Things of Thee Are Spoken

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1085 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1 = Ps. 87: 1-3, Ps. 132:13-14, Matt. 16:18, Isa. 26:1
st. 2 = Ps. 46:4, Rev. 7:17 , Rev. 22:1
st. 3 = Ex. 13:21-22, Ex. 16:14-16, Isa. 4:5-6, Ps. 105:39-41
st. 4 = Gal. 6:14, Matt. 6:19-21, Ps. 87:6

Written in five stanzas by John Newton, this text was published in the Olney Hymns (1779). There it was part of a group of hymns inspired by Scripture passages (Newton referred to Isa. 33:20-22). The original stanzas 1-3 and 5 are printed in the Psalter Hymnal (with "you" in place of the original "thee"). The hymn has been described as the "one truly joyful hymn" in the Olney collection and the evangelical equivalent to the more catholic “The Church's One Foundation.” John Julian ranks “Glorious Things” with the finest hymns in the English language.

The text uses the metaphor of Zion, the (new) city of God (see Heb. 12:22) for the church or people of God. Founded securely on Christ's salvation, God's people experience his presence, protection, and guidance, and share in his glory.

Liturgical Use:
With preaching on ecclesiology (Lord's Day 21, etc.); profession of faith; ordination/commissioning services; church festivals, anniversaries, and ecumenical services.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, AUSTRIA/AUSTRIAN HYMN .

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Copes, V. Earle. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol II Selah 160-722 [1991]
  • Hancock, Gerre. Organ Improvisations for Hymn Singing. Hinshaw HMO-100 [1975]
  • Mawby, Colin.  Hymns for Occasions. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0-86209-568-9 [1994]
  • McKinney, Howard D. Preludes for Fifty-Five Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 9770 [1967]
  • Noble, T. Tertius. Free Organ Accompaniments to One Hundred Well-Known Hymn Tunes. J. Fischer 8175 [1946]
  • Powell, Robert J. Free Hymn Accompaniments. Abingdon APM-513 [1979]
  • Rawsthorne, Noel. 200 Last Verses. Kevin Mayhew ISBN 0 86209 189 6 [1991]
  • Shaw, Geoffrey. The Descant Hymn-Tune Book bk 1. Novello 15207
  • Wilkinson, John T. One Hundred and Four Descants for “The Hymn Book”. enThusia [1980]
  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: John Newton, 1779, alt., P.D.
  • Music (AUSTRIAN HYMN 8.7.8.7 D): Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), 1797, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.

87E: Glorious Things of You Are Spoken

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1085 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1 = Ps. 87: 1-3, Ps. 132:13-14, Matt. 16:18, Isa. 26:1
st. 2 = Ps. 46:4, Rev. 7:17 , Rev. 22:1
st. 3 = Ex. 13:21-22, Ex. 16:14-16, Isa. 4:5-6, Ps. 105:39-41
st. 4 = Gal. 6:14, Matt. 6:19-21, Ps. 87:6

Written in five stanzas by John Newton, this text was published in the Olney Hymns (1779). There it was part of a group of hymns inspired by Scripture passages (Newton referred to Isa. 33:20-22). The original stanzas 1-3 and 5 are printed in the Psalter Hymnal (with "you" in place of the original "thee"). The hymn has been described as the "one truly joyful hymn" in the Olney collection and the evangelical equivalent to the more catholic “The Church's One Foundation.” John Julian ranks “Glorious Things” with the finest hymns in the English language.

The text uses the metaphor of Zion, the (new) city of God (see Heb. 12:22) for the church or people of God. Founded securely on Christ's salvation, God's people experience his presence, protection, and guidance, and share in his glory.

Liturgical Use:
With preaching on ecclesiology (Lord's Day 21, etc.); profession of faith; ordination/commissioning services; church festivals, anniversaries, and ecumenical services.

Other Resources:

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Busarow, Donald. All Praise to You, Eternal God. Augsburg 11-9076 [1980]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Beckstrand, William. Let It Rip! At the Piano. Augsburg 11-11045 [2000]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: John Newton, 1779, alt., P.D.
  • Music (JEFFERSON 8.7.8.7 D): W. Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835; harm. Alfred V. Fedak (b. 1953) © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words: The Words are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to print them.
    • Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.

87F: You Are the Source

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1085 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Nathan Crabtree © 2011 Nathan Crabtree, admin. Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information: