Psalm 98

98A: Sing to the Lord a New Song

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1086 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words and Music: Greg Scheer © 1995 Greg Scheer
  • Reprint Information:

98B: A Responsorial Setting

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1086 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Timothy Dudley-Smith (b. 1926) © 1973 Hope Publishing Company
  • Music (ONSLOW SQUARE 7.7.11.8): David G. Wilson © 1973 The Jubilate Group, admin. Hope Publishing Company
  • Psalm Text: from Evangelical Lutheran Worship © 2006 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, admin. Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: © 2011 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information for the Refrain:
    • Words and Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net or a CCLI License.
    • When reprinting the Psalm Text and Tone, please use the correct copyright line. Faith Alive Christian Resources gives you permission to reprint the Tone for use in a worship setting.

 

  • Words: Psalm 98:3b
  • Music: Robert Hobby from Psalter for Worship, Cycle B © 1996 Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Tone: from Psalter for Worship, Cycle B © 1996 Augsburg Fortress Publishers
  • Reprint Information for the Alternative Refrain:
    • Words and Music: permitted with a license from OneLicense.net.
    • When reprinting the Tone, please use the correct copyright line.

98C: Sing, Sing a New Song to the LORD God

Performance Notes:

  • For performance notes on this song, see page 1086 of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship.
  • The following article is from the Psalter Hymnal Handbook.

Text Information:

A universal call for praise of the LORD's mighty acts of redemption and for the coming of God's righteous rule over all the world.

Scripture References:
st. 1 = vv. 1-3
st. 2 = vv. 4-7
st. 3 = vv. 8-9

In the liturgy of a high festival that annually celebrated the LORD's cosmic rule (perhaps the Feast of Tabernacles), the Levites used Psalm 98 to call first the congregation at the temple (st. 1); then all the people of the earth (st. 2); and finally all creation (st. 2-3) to joyful praise of the LORD. This praise celebrates God's acts of redemption (st. 1) and God's future coming "in righteousness" (v. 9; st. 3).

Dewey D. Westra (b. Holland, MI, 1899; d. Wyoming, MI, 1979) versified this psalm in 1931 for the 1934 Psalter Hymnal; some revisions were made for the 1987 Psalter Hymnal. Other settings of Psalm 98 are at 174,175, and 337.

Westra was a dedicated educator, writer, and musician who faithfully served the Christian Reformed Church. He attended Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Wayne State University in Detroit. In the 1920s and 30s he was a Christian school Principal in Byron Center and Detroit, Michigan. During the 1940s he was involved in various ventures, including becoming a diesel instructor for the Ford Motor Company. After 1947 he became a principal again, serving at Christian schools in Sioux Center, Iowa; Randolph, Wisconsin; and Walker, Michigan.

Westra wrote poetry in English, Dutch, and Frisian, and translated poetry into English from Dutch and Frisian. He arranged many songs and composed songs for children's choirs. He also versified all one hundred and fifty psalms and the Lord's Prayer, as well as the songs of Mary, Zechariah, and Simeon, in meters that fit the corresponding Genevan psalm tunes. His manuscripts are housed in the library of Calvin College. Seventeen of his psalm versifications and his paraphrases of the Lucan canticles were included in the 1934 and in the 1959 editions of the Psalter Hymnal Much of the credit for keeping the Genevan psalms alive in the Christian Reformed Church goes to Westra.

Liturgical Use:
Advent, Christmas, Easter, and other jubilant times of the church year.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following is an alternative accompaniment for this tune, GENEVAN 98/118/RENDEZ Á DIEU.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Proulx, Richard. Hymn Intonations Preludes & Free Harmonizations. Vol. I Selah 160-720 [1991]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Dewey Westra, 1931; rev. Psalter Hymnal, 1987, © 1976 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Music (RENDEZ À DIEU/GENEVAN 98/118 | 9.8.9.8 D): Genevan Psalter, 1551; harm. Dale Grotenhuis, 1985, © 1976 Faith Alive Christian Resources
  • Reprint Information:

98D: Joy to the World!

Performance Notes:

Text Information:

Scripture References:
st. 1-3 = Ps. 98
st. 2 = Ps. 96:11-12
st. 3 = Gen. 3:17-18

Isaac Watts wrote this text as a paraphrase of Psalm 98. He published it in his Psalms of David Imitated (1719) under the heading “The Messiah's Coming and Kingdom.” The paraphrase is Watts' Christological interpretation.

Consequently, he does not emphasize with equal weight the various themes of Psalm 98. In stanzas 1 and 2 Watts writes of heaven and earth rejoicing at the coming of the king. An interlude that depends more on Watts' interpretation than the psalm text, stanza 3 speaks of Christ's blessings extending victoriously over the realm of sin. The cheerful repetition of the non-psalm phrase "far as the curse is found" has caused this stanza to be omitted from some hymnals. But the line makes joyful sense when understood from the New Testament eyes through which Watts interprets the psalm. Stanza 4 celebrates Christ's rule over the nations.

Liturgical Use
Christmas Day, but also at any other time of year in relation to Psalm 98. Raised eyebrows at singing "Joy to the World!" in July will lower as soon as the relationship to Psalm 98 becomes clear.

Tune Information:

ANTIOCH borrows ideas from two choruses and a tenor recitative from Handel's Messiah–"Lift Up Your Heads," "Glory to God in the Highest," and "Comfort Ye My People." The hymn tune is essentially an adaptation and arrangement by Lowell Mason, published in his Occasional Psalms and Hymn Tunes (1836). Mason named the tune ANTIOCH after the New Testament city in which the "followers of the Way" were first called Christians.

With its exuberant air and melodic repeats and sequences, requiring the repetition of textual lines, ANTIOCH has become an enduring favorite for the Watts text. Sing Stanzas 1 and 3 in harmony and give tenors and basses solid accompaniment on their entries in the third line. Sing stanza 4 in unison, possibly with an alternate harmonization on full organ.

Other Resources:

  • Visit hymnary.org for more information on this song and additional resources.
  • The following are alternative accompaniments for this tune, ANTIOCH.

Alternative Harmonization for Organ and Descant Resources:

  • Burkhardt, Michael. As Though the Whole Creation Cried. Morningstar MSM-10-555 [2001]
  • Cassler, G. Winston. Organ Descants for Selected Hymns. Augsburg 11-9304 [1972]
  • Ferguson, John. Hymn Harmonizations for Organ. bk. 2 Ludwig O-07 [1983]
  • Goode, Jack C. Thirty-four Changes on Hymn Tunes. H W Grey GB 644 [1978]
  • Powell, Robert J. Free Hymn Accompaniments. Abingdon APM-513 [1979]
  • Wyton, Alec. New Shoots from Old Roots. SMP KK 279 [1983]

Alternative Harmonization for Piano:

  • Hopson, Hal H. The Creative Use of the Piano in Worship. Hope 8392 [2008]

Copyright Information:

  • Words: Isaac Watts (1674-1748), 1719, P.D.
  • Music (ANTIOCH 8.6.8.6 with repeat): Lowell Mason (1792-1872), 1848, P.D.
  • Reprint Information:
    • Words and Music: both are in Public Domain. You do not need permission to reprint this song.